Sunday Poser # 111

Welcome back to another Sunday Poser

This week my question is;

Courtesy on WP

When you Reblog/ share/ do you ask for permission or inform? Do you Link to the blogger you’re writing about

I’m sure, like me, most of you would have come across followers/ bloggers who share your posts or reblog them without asking you or even intimating you. It always comes as a surprise, sometimes unpleasant to find that out just by the link back.

If I want to share or reblog anyone’s post I ask them first, except the first and second responses to my prompt WDYS, which is a tradition and people expect it.

The same is the case when I link to a blogger’s post, I inform them and mention their post with a link to it in my inspired post.

I think we need to show basic courtesy on WP because neglecting these small gestures, can irritate the people we follow.

What are your thoughts on this? Do you ask or inform before sharing someone’s post? And if you are inspired by someone, do you mention it in your post and post a link to their post?

Please share your thoughts in the comments section or you can write your own post and link it to this one so that I can find it.

As usual, thanks of visiting and reading.

#Keepitalive

#SundayPoser

117 thoughts on “Sunday Poser # 111

  1. Nah. The post is already in the public domain, published for people to read. If I reblog the post, all I’m doing is widening the potential audience. I don’t even feel pressure to notify the author after the fact, because the system does this on my behalf.

    Liked by 3 people

        1. I think that it’s not the Reblog/ re-share but more the fact that they come out of the blue, and without as much as by your leave, share the post on their blog. That irks me. I don’t know about others.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Understood. I don’t see why it should irk you though, unless they are trying to pass your work off as their own. If you only want your work to be seen by certain people, why not password-protect it? You seem to be saying “I don’t want my work, which I’ve already shared, shared”.

            Liked by 2 people

    1. I mean and your right after we post something unless it’s an nft we have no actual claim to it. It’s supposed to be a form of communication though. So by not reaching out in some way, you are almost spitting on the very thing you are trying to do. #etiquette not dead

      Liked by 3 people

      1. It’s not like we have no claim to it. We are the author and we own the copyright. But I don’t think we can complain when, having put it into the public domain, somebody else puts it further into the public domain.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. so but then how do we own the copyright? And I know this seems like I am debating with you. I’m not I agree with you. I just have a really weird way of showing it. I think it goes back to so many other things these days. Tradition and etiquette get sacrificed so much. Because we can. Type shit

          Liked by 2 people

          1. do you mean, how do we prove we own the copyright? I suspect that the creator of the post would have some sort of version history, which a plagarist would not. (WP keep a version history of every change.)

            Incidentally, the copyright notice I use on my own posts invites people to share them, so long as they acknowledge that I am the author.

            Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve only re-blogged someone’s post twice I think, and I asked them first. As far as I know nobody has ever re-blogged anything of mine. I only do the pingbacks on challenges, so that’s kind of a notification I guess. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I never expect anyone to ask my permission to reblog something I posted. Bloggers who don’t want their posts reblogged should disable the reblog feature. Anyone who hasn’t disabled it has no grounds to complain if someone reblogs, with or without permission. The reblog button itself is an open invitation.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I have only reblogged another person’s post once. I did this for a post that Glyn wrote about Melanie after she passed away. They were friends for years and although he is a frequent commenter, he does not make many posts, so I wanted other people to see what he wrote about his longtime friend. I did not ask for his permission before I did this, but I was the one who suggested that he should write something about her. I do reblog my own posts that I write on Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie where I am part of the writing staff.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Sadje, I have had a few people just copy my post instead of reblogging. Although i never mention it to them, the polite thing to do is to reblog so the readers read a few lines on their blog, then are redirected to mine to read the entire piece. By doing so, the person who wrote the blog gets views and acknowledgement as well as the person who reblogged it. If for some reason the blog is so short that the entire post is shown in the reblog, then it is only fair to publish a link to the original blogger’s blog. I take it for granted that if the person has a reblog button on their blog, that it is okay to reblog it, and they are automatically notified in notifications that I have done so. I don’t think it is necessary, therefore, for the reblogger to notify them as well.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thanks Judy for sharing your thoughts. Copying and pasting the entire post is plagiarism and shouldn’t be allowed. Reblogging a post can some times only leave a link which is a bit disconcerting.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. This is a good question, Sadje. I agree with the suggestion to disable the repost function if there is concern about reblogging. On our blogs, we are sharing our lives, in a way, and giving permission for others to enjoy and share. By sharing, they are also saving the blog to enjoy later, but I suppose they could just return to your blog. One thing you can do is to state on each blog post your desire for others to ask before sharing.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Honestly, I can’t imagine why anyone would post something on a public blog (or social media, or any other forum) and then be offended if someone reblogs it/links to it. That said, if a blogger really doesn’t want their stuff shared, and they can’t disable the reblog button, the obvious solution would be to set their blog to private and allow only readers whom they know and trust. Or they could password-protect any post they don’t want shared and give the password only to readers whom they trust. But getting huffy because someone made use of a reblog button that was sitting right there in plain sight strikes me as rather silly.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. When I wrote a parenting column for SwimSwam, I’d be surprised to find my articles without any permission from me or SwimSwam on Swim Teams websites and newsletters. I guess I should be flattered, but I don’t think it was right.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. When I use my phone for posting, I am unable to disable the reblog button. But when I am working on desktop/laptop, I can do that. I rarely ever reblog because in my circle of blogger friends, we are mostly following the same set of bloggers. But when I submit a poem to a blogger, I do ask them if they would be okay if I reblog. But strangers reblogging my post, without even liking or commenting on my post is something that irks me.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Punam for sharing your thoughts and experiences. I solely blog from my phone and in the reader you cannot disable the share button, at least I don’t know any way of doing it. I think it’s proper courtesy to at least inform before sharing a post.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I have asked on occasion when a piece inspired me to comment or create a post, but generally, I link back to their post to give credit. Also, images I post will give credit unless I don’t know where they originated from after a search.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I’m learning that it’s good if people get permission because if they ever use their work in a book, you have to take it off your blog and ask people to release your work they have reblogged as well. It’s a real pain I’m finding. 🥹

    Liked by 2 people

    1. At least that. But blogging world is huge and finding my posts with perhaps my photos and information on a site that I haven’t heard of even, is a bit disturbing for me.

      Like

  12. When I first came across a re-post I thought someone was trying to steal my work without acknowledgement. The courtesy of saying they were going to re-blog would have made me feel more at ease.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. I don’t do many reblogs these days, but it’s always a link to their site, and when I do the annual clean up of my site, most of them are deleted (they use up space, especially if there are pics involved).

    Liked by 2 people

    1. There is some confusion about reblogging. A reblog usually includes a paragraph or two from the original site but the reblog itself is simply a link to someone else’s site, Images from someone else’s site are not stored in the reblogger’s media file. By the same token, if the original blog is removed the link/reblog will show as page not found.

      I also noticed that some bloggers use copy and paste and fob it off as a reblog but do not use the reblog option. That is wrong and unfair.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. I’ve found many added images in my media file from reblogged posts. And it’s a proper reblog, not a copy and paste. It’s worth checking the media file now, especially since there are limits on storage capacity, even for paid sites.

        Liked by 3 people

        1. I once queried this with WP. I was told that what we show on our site pages are simply links.

          So what you say is interesting, I’ve never noticed images in the media file, perhaps I wasn’t paying enough attention! Thank you for telling me that.

          The storage allocation on my site is exactly the same as it was when I began blogging a good few years ago.
          Mine is a paid site but I resize my images before uploading to WP.

          I’m very conscious about the size of images that are uploaded to our websites and of course the length of time it takes for readers to open large image files.

          You’re probably aware that during the past year WP overhauled the price plans for all new sites along with the storage allocation for new free sites. The new free sites have only been allocated 1GB of storage. That seems a little unfair given the amount of adverts that are inflicted on free sites.

          Thank you for your reply, it’s appreciated. 🙂

          .

          Liked by 1 person

          1. This is the WordPress storage allocations per level:
            Free: 1GB, Personal: 6GB; Premium: 13GB; Business: 200GB; eCommerce: 200GB
            I got the info here: https://wordpress.com/pricing/
            and then clicked on ‘compare our plans’.
            Re: pics coming across from reblogs – it’s worth checking your media file after a reblog to see if it happens. Not all reblogs work that way, but if there is a gallery, or a display of many images on the originating site, it happens.

            Liked by 2 people

            1. My Nan’s farm site is a Premium site, and despite seven years of blogging, I still have two-thirds of storage available.

              Our Weekly Prompts site is a Personal site, but we still have lots of storage because we only upload a couple of images each week, plus the occasion Support page for our How To section.

              I have a couple of videos in Nan’s Farm media file, but these days I use Vimeo to host my videos.

              I haven’t reblogged for a couple of years, but when I have more time, I’ll try a reblog from my other site.

              Liked by 2 people

  14. I rarely reblog the posts of others but on the occasions I have reblogged I did not ask permission, however, I have always included an introduction and acknowledgement.

    Reblogging is a huge compliment to the original blogger.

    It’s a tricky one and while no one wishes to offend, it sounds as though some people are unaware that this is the way it works and that reblogging is standard practice and always has been.
    It’s naive to expect someone to ask permission when the writer has already made it public property. If someone doesn’t want their work re-blogged, they should make their site private ie friends only or remove the reblog button.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Sue for sharing. Acknowledging the original writer is a good way to do it. But some people would just lift your post, or several posts and Reblog them without any intimidation. More often than not, these people don’t write anything of their own on their site.

      Like

  15. Back when I first began blogging, I always, always asked permission to reblog, but so many just said, “Sure, you don’t have to ask … it’s an honour to see my work shared” that I stopped asking, except in a few situations where the blog is either very personal or controversial. Now, I assume if there is a reblog button at the end of the post, the author doesn’t mind if I reblog. I always thank the author in my introductory blurb.

    Liked by 2 people

        1. Yes that is exactly right. Yet I personally don’t want to lose the ownership of my writing. I’ve been here 4+ years and have built a readership. I’m happy that those who follow my blog, at least some percent of them visit daily and read my blog.

          Like

  16. Great question, Sadje. I don’t reblog at all, yet do link to friends sites when I am promoting their work, or referencing them in some way. I think it’s very important to always link back to the original content and creator of the content.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I always make mention of the author and reference their home page too along with the reblog. Only ran into one person who didn’t want a relog done and that was stated right in the blog post.

    Liked by 1 person

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